Investment in Drug/Alcohol Treatment

June 8, 2009

The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse has just released its three-year study.  For every $100 the state of Oklahoma spent on substance abuse over the last 3 years, $2.30 went toward prevention and treatment.  The state can save millions if it spends more on treatment and prevention, Joseph Califano said.

Califano is founder of the non-profit foundation, which is sited at Columbia University, New York. After serving in various government positions in the Department of Defense and practicing as a partner in the well-known law firm of Williams, Connolly & Califano, he served as United States Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare from 1977 to 1979.  From that position he was fired by President Jimmy Carter, reportedly for his aggressive anti-smoking campaign.

“In terms of public spending, it is an upside-down cake,” Califano said.  “It is an inexcusable waste of money when we could avoid all the human wreckage, and all the public spending that’s imposed on taxpayers if we could just move to prevent this disease, to treat this disease.”

The report ranks Oklahoma twenty-second among the fifty states in percentage of substance abuse spending for prevention and treatment.  “The middle of the pack isn’t good enough…I would like to see us leading the nation,” said Terri White, state secretary of health and mental health and substance abuse services commissioner for the state.  “This report is a national study confirming what we know in Oklahoma, which is when you invest in the prevention of addiction and the treatment of addiction, the overall costs to the state go down even above what you spend.”

Oklahoma’s drug court costs about $5,000 per offender, whereas incarceration costs from $10,000 to $19,000 per offender per year.

Suggestions are that funding more treatment programs could come from a sales tax on alcohol of one or two cents or from the $95,000,000 Oklahoma Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust.

The report is based on data from 2005.  New Hampshire spent $0.22 per $100, while Connecticut spent $10.39.  Oklahoma’s $2.38 per $100 is about the national average.  The report states that most of the spending by local, state and federal government is for health care from untreated addiction, which causes or contributes to more than seventy other diseases.  In 2005, Oklahoma spent $24,600,000 on substance abuse, while the federal government spent $238,200,000,000.

The Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse estimates that 5% of the population over the age of 18 needs treatment for alcohol addiction (140,000 people); that 1% the population needs treatment for other types of drug addictions (21,000 people); that 6% of the adolescent population needs treatment for alcohol and drug addiction (about 20,000 young adults); about 7 ½ people need alcohol treatment for each person who needs drug treatment in Oklahoma.